Bad Impressions, FIN

Those who guessed Curry’s not a normal cat, give yourself a cookie, okay?

Anyway…
I always planned to have nice sketches between the finished chapter and the new ones – But I always wanted to skip these for the webversion. But guess what? I need a short break between chapters, just for sanity purposes.

So, chapter dividers, they’re a thing now.

No, there’s still one page left in Another Life (…

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queengwenevere:

All right, so I’ve been asked for advice on pricing and the business of freelancing, and rather than try to somehow telepathically communicate links via Tumblr’s message system that doesn’t allow links, I thought I might as well put together a post of resources for figuring out the practical side of being an artist. Because this is stuff everyone needs to know anyway, right?

First off, a super-useful book for freelancers is “The Graphic Artists Guild Handbook: Pricing & Ethical Guidelines”. The prices may be skewed to the USA, but they give a good ballpark idea of approximately what’s expected in the market. So it’s a good starting point for figuring out your own prices and not ending up with something completely whacked out. The book also has tons of sample forms and information on best practices, which can be even more useful than the prices.

HANDY WEBSITES

Here’s some sites that often have good articles on the business of art and the finer points of freelancing:

artpact.com
theartorder.com
muddycolors.blogspot.com

FORUMS
Potentially useful forums (mostly concept art oriented, but they sometimes cover more general things too.)

CGTalk (AKA the forums on cgsociety.org)
polycount.com
penciljack.com
ConceptArt.org

* Yes I know ConceptArt.org has had a lot of political and technical turmoil lately, but the archives have a wealth of useful material. What I usually do is use Google to search the CA archives: type the topic you want + “ConceptArt.org” + optionally the section you think the topic is in (the “Art Discussion” section used to have a lot of stuff on the practical side of art.)

CGHub used to be another one, but it’s officially dead, alas. There’s a new one called "DrawCrowd", but right now it looks like it’s mostly for art sharing/eye candy and not so much for discussion/info.

OTHER RESOURCES
If you’ve got the money to spend, this is supposed to be pretty good:
theartoffreelancing.com

And it looks like there will be a useful video or two posted here (coming soon, but I have my eye on it:)
artconnectionacademy.com

And a spot of all-around good advice, with cartoons!

I’m sure I’m missing a lot more resources, if I think of more I’ll add them!

EDIT: I wrote up some more notes on pricing and contracts here!

This is a fantastic collection of info. The forums especially are worth checking out, if you desire to talk with other artists.

So, marketing… Or better yet, getting known.

When I started Traces of Chaos back in June last year, I consciously gave myself a one-year moratorium on actually promoting my comic.

It did make and still makes sense in the regard that I first wanted to sort out my update rythm and make sure I can put out regular pages. It was a good idea. I learned a lot about keeping up a webcomic, update schedules, buffer maintenance and how severly life can screw with an artist trying to feed the hungry beast of a webcomic - and I am glad I did that with just a few eyeballs on my performance.

Well, the one year moratorium is ending on June 15th and I am looking at ways how to market ToC - or, more accurately - making people aware that this story exists. To show them the cool thing I’m doing and to hopefully have a few of them stick around to follow Siendes journey.

It used to be that you made a comic and they came, due word of mouth, links, and the early social networks. This was how Schlock Mercenary, Penny Arcarde and Something Positive grew - but it also how they grew ten years ago, in a totally different epoch of the internet.

These days there are so much more webcomics, so much more readers and the market is fragmented - and it’s tough to get out there to those who’d love your work, simply because there is so much other noise. And it’s even tougher to get information on how to do so, simple because it’s such a big topic.

So I decided I’ll blog about it from time to time. I am pretty sure I am not the only webcomicer out there struggling with the same problem. Hope this will be helpful!

Another Life part 1, page 14

Another Life part 1, page 14

Siendes has opinions about Controllers being on Earth. They range from “kill it” to “kill it with FIRE!”.  The only reason she doesn’t go “Nuke it from orbit!” is it’s Earth and friendly fire is bad.

Well, she’s seen the damage they can do first hand. The ones who’s liquefied brains run out of their ears are considered the lucky ones.

(PS: I’ll post the colours together with the next page next…

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projectkr:

travelingmadness:

pugletto:

prrb:

How I pratice drawing things, now in a tutorial form.
The shrimp photo I used is here
Show me your shrimps if you do this uvu 

PS: lots of engrish because foreign 

This is the best art advice ever and you should all listen to it because it’s basically what I’ve been telling people for years.

image

i was not expecting that to actually work

Reblogging every time this pops up on my dash because this is helpful for everyone .

(via kiichipan)

10 typical perspective errors

helpyoudraw:

electricalice:

Drawing perspective is considered one of the hardest things in art, except the mistakes usually done are pretty much always the same and can be avoided with a little care.

1. Lines not reaching the vanishing point

image

Well this is pretty simple to avoid but it’s the most common mistake. It’s probably due to either carelessness or really not having understood the basic of perspective. I encourage you to go back and find some basic tutorial for this.

Anyway, be ALWAYS careful about where to ‘send’ your lines, they NEED to go towards the correct vanishing point or it will just look awkward. Double check if necessary.

And always, ALWAYS use a ruler.

If your style requires lines that are a bit less geometrical (as mine do, I have a style of inking that’s sketchy so ‘perfect’ lines drawn with a ruler usually don’t fit well in the picture) use a ruler anyway for the pencils and then ink later by freehand. At least you’ll have correct guidelines underneath.

image

For traditional drawing be sure you have a ruler and be sure to use it for each one of your lines.

Modern drawing software will help you a lot with this if you draw directly on computer: painting software such as Clip Studio Paint or Manga Studio 4EX or 5 have perspective tools that will automatically snap your lines towards the vanishing point.

image

it’s quite a long tutorial, you’ll find the rest under the Read More or you can download the pdf file here

Read More

This is a pretty good tutorial. Perspective ain’t that hard if you know what to look out for, and this is a rather nice overview about the most important things to watch.

dresdencodak:

I started Dresden Codak nine years ago. Here’s a comparison of the very first strip I uploaded with the last panel of the most recent page.
In 2005 I was a floundering 21-year-old college student with no direction and growing debt. I drew that snake comic in a statistics class I was failing, and on my way home I decided to scan it and maybe put together a website. I thought if I kept doing that, I could teach myself to draw, as a fun hobby.
Since then, this comic has become my full time job (since 2008), and last year I raised over half a million dollars in the second most successful comics Kickstarter ever. I draw what I like, I have fans all around the globe, and most fortunately, I know what I want to do with my life. In those nine years I’ve had countless people from all corners tell me I couldn’t do this or that, or that I was wasting my time trying something that had no future or point. At the end of the day, though, I can only say “I’ll show you,” and I try to do just that.
Never underestimate the power of time, hard work, and stubbornness.

No kidding - Dresden Codak is THE inspiration each time I end discouraged with my artwork. I hope I can pull off something similiar with my comic.

dresdencodak:

I started Dresden Codak nine years ago. Here’s a comparison of the very first strip I uploaded with the last panel of the most recent page.

In 2005 I was a floundering 21-year-old college student with no direction and growing debt. I drew that snake comic in a statistics class I was failing, and on my way home I decided to scan it and maybe put together a website. I thought if I kept doing that, I could teach myself to draw, as a fun hobby.

Since then, this comic has become my full time job (since 2008), and last year I raised over half a million dollars in the second most successful comics Kickstarter ever. I draw what I like, I have fans all around the globe, and most fortunately, I know what I want to do with my life. In those nine years I’ve had countless people from all corners tell me I couldn’t do this or that, or that I was wasting my time trying something that had no future or point. At the end of the day, though, I can only say “I’ll show you,” and I try to do just that.

Never underestimate the power of time, hard work, and stubbornness.


No kidding - Dresden Codak is THE inspiration each time I end discouraged with my artwork.

I hope I can pull off something similiar with my comic.

(via rosalarian)